10 Vilest Villains of Fictional Literature

Villains – we all love to hate them. Without wicked characters, most books would be extremely dull. This list looks at ten of the most vile of the vile villains to grace the pages of literary works.

 

The Wicked Witch of the West from Baum’s “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.”

Wicked-Witch

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She covets. That is her nature. She wants Dorothy’s silver slippers. The Wizard himself believes that the Witch’s magic is more powerful and could kill him in an instant if he goes near her.

The Wizard finally offers Dorothy a trip home if she will kill the Witch. That’s how loathsome she is to the embodiment of good in Oz. The Witch actively tries to kill Dorothy and company several times, with wolves, bees, the winged monkeys, crows. She captures the Cowardly Lion and tries to starve him to death. She tries to burn the Scarecrow to death. All to force Dorothy to give up the slippers. She steals one of Dorothy’s slippers, by tripping her over an invisible bar. Dorothy finally has enough and throws a bucket of water on her. Why does it kill her? Because water is pure. The Witch is thorough corruption in all respects, and thus the embodiment of impurity. writing,literature, science fiction, great books, poetry, creative writing, history of science, historical fiction, POPULAR FICTIONwriting,literature, science fiction, great books, poetry, creative writing, history of science, historical fiction, POPULAR FICTION writing,literature, science fiction, great books, poetry, creative writing, history of science, historical fiction, POPULAR FICTION 

 

Pap Finn from Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.”

Pap

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No wonder Huck Finn doesn’t really care for religion. Why should he honor his father, if his father is a drunken child beater? When he first appears, he is pasty white, sweaty, filthy, stinks, and repeatedly threatens to beat Huck to death if he doesn’t stop trying to be civil for Miss Watson.

He is probably the only character in the story that Huck really hates, but Huck is also scared to death of him, and reluctantly obeys him as much as he has to. Pap kidnaps Huck and forces him to live with him, tries to sue the local judge for the money Huck found at the end of “Tom Sawyer,” on the pretense that Huck is Pap’s property, because Pap made him, and thus the money belongs to Pap, and was never Huck’s to give away.

Huck finally just escapes from him out of terror and loathing. Jim finds Pap dead later, and doesn’t tell Huck until the end. No one sheds a tear.

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