Top 10 Cutting-Edge Innovations In The Future Of Forensic Science

For police, prosecuting attorneys, criminologists, and forensic scientists alike, emerging technologies will almost certainly revolutionize the future of forensic science, making the capture and conviction of criminals increasingly likely. These technologies can help investigators in missing persons cases, cold cases, sexual assault cases, and murder cases.

Although potential dangers related to personal privacy have caused controversy about the use of these technologies, it seems clear that these ten cutting-edge innovations in the future of forensic science also promise enormous benefits to authorities, victims, victims’ families, and society in general. robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, 

10 Facial Recognition Algorithm

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Smartphones and other mobile devices equipped with facial recognition software can already identify individuals under ideal conditions, such as having a good-quality photo of the person in a database with which to compare in real time, but such conditions often don’t exist. In addition, people’s faces change over time, and donning a pair of sunglasses or growing a beard can prevent the technology from making a match between the photos. Videos, which offer a series of images, should, in theory, provide a better chance for forensic science to identify a suspect, but that doesn’t always happen, as the case of the Boston Marathon bombing proves: In a test of three facial recognition systems, only one identified Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, and none of them recognized Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who wore sunglasses.

Animetrics may have the answer to these problems. The company has developed software that converts 2-D images into “simulated 3-D models of a person’s face” in about a second, and the software’s users can alter a suspect’s attitude or position. The resulting “headshot image” can be analyzed by all facial recognition algorithms. On a sophisticated laptop, the headshot can be matched against as many as one million faces. For smartphones, the algorithms must be scaled down, which makes them less effective. Experts are confident that the limitations of smartphones can be offset in the future by using the cloud to compute the algorithms. Then, the technology will fit into the palm of a police officer’s hand, allowing almost instantaneous identification of suspects.[1] robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, innovation, robotics, artificial intelligence, 

9 Fingerprint Analysis

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Although computers expedite database searches for fingerprints on file that may match one obtained at a crime scene, an analyst makes the final judgement as to whether the print that’s on hand is of adequate quality to proclaim a match. If a matching print isn’t in the database, no match can be made, no matter the quality of the fingerprint from the crime scene. But, even if no match is made, or two analysts differ in their opinions that a match has occurred, the fingerprint may still have evidentiary value.

Annemieke van Dam of the University of Amsterdam’s Academic Medical Center points out that fingerprints consist, in part, of “proteins and fats secreted from our skin,” which “could reveal a host of information about the person who left them,” including his or her diet. In the future, van Dam predicts, fingerprints may even identify whether the person who left them is a meat-eater or a vegetarian.

Other researchers have found that fingerprints can also show whether the person who left them behind handled a condom and, if so, its brand. Van Dam is confident that, in the future, such fingerprint analysis results will be commonplace. That’s not all. In the future, fingerprints’ DNA could be used to develop a suspect’s “genetic profile,” allowing investigators to acquire a good idea of the subject’s physical appearance.[2]

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